Human, Other

after 1977 

 

 

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Head, 1977, oil on canvas. 

Philip Guston, 1913-1980, American born Canada.  MOMA, NY

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled, 1980, black and white photograph.

Ana Mendieta, Cuban-American, 1948-1985.  Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

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Lady Dog Lizard, oil on canvas on two panels, 1985. 

James Rosequist, 1933-2017, American.  MOMA, NY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Golem, 1987, papier-mache made from Chinese and Japanese newspaper and glue, with metal frame support. 

Robert Wilson, American born 1981 and Moidele Bickel, German born 1937. The Jewish Museum, NY

 

  This golem, an animated being made from earth in Jewish tradition, was designed as both costume and sculpture.  The costume was made for an experimental play of Robert Wilson’s.

 

 

 

 

 

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Untitled, 1992, beeswax and human hair. 

Robert Gober, American born 1954.  Philadelphia Art Museum

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled (Animal); 1999; carbon steel. 

Rona Pondick, American born 1952.  Philadelphia Art Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life is A Cycle, 1993, wood.

  Eiko Fan born 1953.  Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tender Souls, 1995, offset lithograph on paper. 

Wandsworth Jarrell, 1929- , American.  Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled, 2002-2004,  beeswax, pigment, human hair, silver-plated cast brass, cast plastic. 

Robert Gober, American born 1954.  Philadelphia Art Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My Strength Lies, ink, acrylic, photomechanically printed cut and pasted paper, contact paper, metallic sequin and glitter on two mylar sheets; 2006.  2 panels, 8′ tall each.

Wangechi Mutu, Kenyan-American born 1972.   Metropolitan Museum, NY from whose online site these images are taken 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The NewOnes Will Free Us  – The Seated II (one of 4)

Wangechi Mutu, Kenyan-American born 1972.   

Created in 2019  for the facade of the Metropolitan Musuem, NY where they were exhibited between November 2019 and June 2020

 

 

 

 

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The NewOnes Will Free Us  – The Seated (one of 4)

Wangechi Mutu, Kenyan-American born 1972.

Created for the facade of the Metropolitan Museum, NY where they were exhibited between November 2019 and June 2020

Photo of Todd Geisler in the NY Times, published 11/20/2019

 

 

This work is associated with Afro-Futurism:

an aesthetic in film and video, the graphic arts, music, literature including comic books and science fiction which link Africans and the African diaspora with the aid of technology, to the fullest expression of autonomous human life. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NUD Cycladic 9, 2010, Nylon, synthetic fiber, concrete, steel wire. 

Sarah Lucas, British born 1962,  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Double Vision, 2014, mixed media on paper. 

Chitra Ganesh, born 1975.  Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

 

 

 

 

 

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Views of To the Son of Man Who Ate the Scroll, 2016, android, plastic coat, expandable foam shoe, and cardboard and linen shoe. 

Goshka Macuga, Polish born 1967.  Loaned by the Prada Foundation to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2018. 

This humanoid (android) talks. 

He recited text from Thomas Paine, Alfred Einstein, Walter Benjamin, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Ayn Rand which deal with the definition of humanity and of consciousness.

 

 

 

 

 

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Raising Robotic Natives, 2016,  mixed media.

Stephan Bognar, German born 1993; Philipp Schmitt, German born 1993, Jonas Voigt, German born 1992.   On exhibit at the Philadelphia Art Museum in 2019/2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

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trustful, blissful, felt, suffering, 2018, metal, velvet, wool, alpaca and yak hair, ceramic, worm shell. 

Caitlin O’Dea Ott, 2018 BFA graduate, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naiad, 2020, synthetic resin. 

Brandt Brignola, no other information given.  Exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2020

 

 

 

Rhythm I, mixed media sculpture, 2018. 

Max Bowden, Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in 2018.  No other information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little Nest, coloured pencil on paper, 2019.

Alyssa DeVille. No other information.  Exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in 2019

 

 

 

 

The Second Martian (Rasun), 2019, oil on canvas.  

Alyssa DeVille; no other information provided. On exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia 

 

The First Martian (Eirene), 2016, oil on canvas. 

Alyssa DeVille; no other information provided. On exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia in 2019

 

 

 

 

 

The Rocking Chair, 2017, oil on canvas, and detail. 

Alyssa DeVille; no other information. On exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia in 2019 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alien Days, 2019, acrylic, paint, 100+ digital photos. 

Sal Heggeman, Bachelor of Fine Arts Program, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reclining Nude, 1976, acrylic on canvas. 

Tommy Dale Palmore, American born 1944. Woodmere Museum of Art, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adam Lupton, Canadian  born 1987.  Exhibited at Cerberus Gallery, NY in 2020

 

Artist statement:  “My work grows out of my OCD, where performing mental and physical rituals, endlessly seeking assurance, and repeating mantras and projections make up my every day – mediating between myself and an unyielding “otherness.”

 

 

 

 

 

Self-Portrait as Someone Else, 2019, oil on canvas. 

Adam Lupton, Canadian  born 1987.  Exhibited at Cerberus Gallery, NY in 2020

 

Artist statement:  “My work grows out of my OCD, where performing mental and physical rituals, endlessly seeking assurance, and repeating mantras and projections make up my every day – mediating between myself and an unyielding “otherness.”

 

 

 

 

Sacred Kingship, 2020, oil on canvas

Adam Lupton, Canadian  born 1987.  Exhibited at Cerberus Gallery, NY in 2020

 

Artist statement:  “My work grows out of my OCD, where performing mental and physical rituals, endlessly seeking assurance, and repeating mantras and projections make up my every day – mediating between myself and an unyielding “otherness.”

 

 

 

 

 

Screen 2020, oil on canvas.

  Kristy JaneFrom-Brown, MFA Program in 2021 at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

King Duck the Second, 2021, oil on panel. 

Xi Wu, BFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia in 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stranger Visions, 3-D printed plastic, 2012-13, propietary chemicals,  DNA, DNA preservation chemicals, water, chemicals.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg, American born 1982.  Exhibited at the Philadelphia Art Museum in 2020. 

The artist collected discarded chewing-gum and other saliva-covered debris in New York city.  Working with a lab, she gathered DNA and extracted data responding to physical traits.   She used this to generate portraits. 

These portraits have a ‘family resemblance’ but cannot be exact.  The artist wonders if we should not be more skeptical than we often are about the use of such data.

 

 

 

The artist has also evolved a 2-spray cleaning agent – she called it Invisible – which removes 99.5 of all genetic information in or on a given site.  An extreme form of human otherness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portal Figure, 1985, epoxy resin with graphite and iron oxide powder.  James Lloyd, American born 1944. 

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exit the Portal, 2020, pen and ink. 

Clarissa Keir, Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia in 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 thoughts on “Human, Other

    1. I agree: some of the images are disturbing. But then I comforted myself with the knowledge that these images of hybrids of all kinds is an old part of our mythology, religion and art and this is just a continuation. Sarah

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