Glass and its imitators

Mostly north American but not only.  On exhibit in museums between NY and DC, 2010-2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details of The Engagement Ball installed as an apartment window,  painted and leaded, 1885, Passy France.

Luc Olivier Merson, 1846-1920 and Eugene Oudinot, 1827-1889, both French.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

 

 

 

Lamps made in New England in the middle of the 19th century.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

 

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Vase of blown, acid-edged and gilded glass made between 1901 and 1915 by the Honesdale Decorating Company which operated in Honesdale, Pennsylvania between 1901 and 1932.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

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Cream pitcher of press glass made between 1883/84 – 1991 by Challinor Taylor and Company, 1886-1900; Tarentum, Pennsylvania.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

 

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Punch bowl, free blown lead glass, etched with a ‘Kalana Lily’ pattern; made by C. Dorflinger and Sons, who operated in White Mills, Pennsylvania from 1865-1921. Philadelphia Museum of Art

 

 

 

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Cameo vase, 1886-’87.  Free-blown glass in which blue glass was overlaid with white glass.  Made in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by Gillinder & Sons, 1871-1930 

 

 

 

 

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Vase of blown, acid-edged and gilded glass made between 1901 and 1915 by the Honesdale Decorating Company which operated in Honesdale, Pennsylvania between 1901 and 1932.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

 

 

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Blown and cut glass made in New York state between 1885 and 1900. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

 

 

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Blown, cut and engraved glass made between 1915 and 1925 by Steuben Glassworks (1903-Present) in Corning, NY.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

 

 

 

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Vase of free-blown glass, 1905;  made by  Honesdale Decorating Company, 1901-1932; Honesdale, Pennsylvania in 1905.  Philadelphia Museum of Art

 

 

 

 

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Iridescent Handkerchief Glass; straw, opal soda-lime glass made by the Whitefriars Glassworks, England which operated between 1836 and 1980.  Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington

 

 

 

 

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Pitcher made between 1886 and 1890 by Hobbs, Brockunier and Company in Wheeling, West Virginia, 1863-1891.  Blown-molded, non-lead glass decorated with pointed hobnail pattern. Philadelphia Art Museum

 

 

 

 

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 The Viking Ship, 1883-’84, stained glass

Edward Burne-Jones, 1833-1894, British with Morris and Company (1875-1940).  Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington

 

 

 

 

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Blown, acid-etched and gilded glass made by the Honesdale Decorating Company in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, 1901-1932.  Metropolitan Museum of New York

 

 

 

 

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Dragonfly reading lamp, 1895.  Lewis Comfort Tiffany, 1848-1933, American

On exhibit from the Neustadt Collection, NY at Winterthur, Delaware in 2013

 

 

 

 St. Cornelius, stained glass lancet windows, 1910, made by Tiffany Stuidos, NY. 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

 

 

 

 

Assortment of flat glass, 1893-1920, Tiffany Furnaces and other glass companies in New York state and in Indiana. 

Lewis Comfort Tiffany died in 1933.  His firm was closed in 1937.

Hundreds of thousands of pieces of flat glass of all sizes were auctioned as part of the liquidation which included everything in his studio.  This collection of glass makes up part of the Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass.

 

 

 

 

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Dream Garden, 1914-15.

  Made with the studio of Louis Comfort Tiffany of 100,000 pieces of Tiffany glass: iridescent, translucent, opaque, transparent glass.  The design was by Maxfield Parrish’s (American, 1870-1966).  

It was installed in 1916 in the east lobby entrance of the Curtis Center, Philadelphia, where it remains.  It belongs today to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

 

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To Be Looked At (from the Other Side of the Glass) Close to, For almost an Hour, 1918; oil, silver leaf, lead wire, magnifying lens on glass (cracked) mounted between panes of glass in a standing metal frame on painted wooden  base. 

Marcel Duchamp, 1887-1968, American born France. MOMA, NY

 

The artist called this his Small Glass to distinguish it from the Large Glass.

Anyone following the instructions for how to look through the magnifying lens would find what he was looking at distorted.  The viewer then would himself or herself be on view while other people around try to figure out what the viewer is doing.

 

The artist made this piece in Buenos Aires where he had fled to get away from the air of war in the United States.  He mailed it back and the glass cracking delighted him

 

 

 

Visitors in November 2019 in the Duchamp gallery of the Philadelphia Art Museum. 

In front The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-1923, oil, varnish, lead foil, lead wire, and dust on two glass panels. 

Marcel Duchamp, 1887-1968, American born France.

 

 

 

 

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Vase with acid-etched decoration made as sculpture in 1923 by Maurice Marinot, 1882-1950, French.  On display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2015 and 2016

 

 

 

 

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Thick-walled glassware made as sculpture in 1923.

 Maurice Marinot, 1882-1950, French.  On display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2015 and 2016. 

So onerous and detrimental to the artist’s health was the making of thick-walled vessels that he had to give it up.

 

 

Stained Glass, c. 1930. 

Nicola D’Ascenzo, 1871-1954, American born Italy. 

Designed for a Horn and Hardart Restaurant in center city Philadelphia, this being the first chain restaurant in the country.  The artist, an immigrant from the Abruzzi, joined a stained glass studio which had been established in Philadelphia in 1896.

 

 

 

Shooting Stars, 1952, glass, casein and tempera on Masonite.  Irene Rice Pereira, 1902-1971, American.  MOMA, NY

Two sheets of painted, fluted glass sitting in front of a painted panel set in an artist’s frame.

 

 

 

 

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Untitled, 1965, galvanized glass and Plexiglass. 

Donald Judd, 1928-1994, American. National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

Windshield, acrylic on canvas with wipers, 1963.

  Elizabeth Osborne, American born 1936.  Private collection on loan to the Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington in 2016

 

 

 

 

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Glass Stratum, 1967, glass. 

Robert Smithson, 1938-1973, American.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

Hanging Islands, conceived 1966, refabricated 2015, acrylic and metal with 35 prisms. 

Charles Ross, American born 1937.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC 

 

 

 

 

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The Written Object (the bottle of milk), 1967; photographic canvas with four painted milk bottles on a painted wooden shelf. 

Marcel Broodthaers, 1924-1976, Belgian.  On exhibition at MOMA, New York, 2015 and 2016 

 

 

 

 

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The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truths, and its reflection, neon, 1967. 

Bruce Nauman, American born 1941.  Philadelphia Museum of Art

 

 

 

 

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Sweet Suite Substitute, conceived 1968, fabricated 1982.

  Bruce Nauman, American born 1941.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

 

Window, 1968, oil on canvas. 

Gerhard Richter, German, 1932.  I do not recall where I saw this.

 

 

 

 

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Plexi Pectoral, plexiglas and metal, 1971.

Carolyn Kriegman, 1933-1999, American.  Philadelphia Art Museum on display, 2019/2020

 

 

 

 

Self-portrait of Stars, 1973, photograph on transparent plastic. 

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Italian born 1933.  Loaned by the Cittadelarte – Fondazione Pistoletto to the Philadelphia Art Museum in 2010.

Silhouette of the artist’s body encompassing another of stars.

 

 

 

 

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Window created for Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, Philadelphia, 1982, 40 porcelain tiles washed with copper salts, each handcrafted and applied to frosted glass, wood frame. 

Rudolf Staffel, 1911-2002, American.  Philadelphia Museum of Art

 

 

 

 

 

Glass Bowl (Urban Bowl series), 1983, constructed and painted glass with oil paint. 

Jay Museler, American born 1949.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC.  Photo from their website.

 

 

 

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Parkman Coupe, 1988, glass and bronze.  Dan Dailey, American born 1947.

This celebrates the contribution of Dr. Paul Parkman’s contribution to  the vaccine against German measles.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

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Untitled (Night Train), 1989, glass, silicone, glass and coal.

David Hammons, born 1943, American.  Museum of Modern Art, NY 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ruby Wet Foot Mongo with Kissing Serpents and Lily Pad, 1990, glass.

Fritz Dresisbach, American born 1941.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

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When the Hunter Sings, the Birds Take Wing; 1991; stained glass: cut, sandblasted, engraved, painted and fired

 

Judith Schaechter, American, born 1961: work exhibited at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, Philadelphia in 2015. 

 

 

 

 

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Sea Foam and Amber-Tipped Chandelier, 1994, glass and silver leaf. 

Dale Chihuli, American born 1941.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington DC

 

 

 

 

 

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Raft, 1997, glass with steel stand. 

William Morris, American born 1957.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

 

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Persian Windows; blown glass, 1999 and 2000 and 2005.

Dale Chihuly, born 1941, American.  Delaware Art Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mandara, 2005, glass. 

Lino Tagliapietra, born 1934 Murano, Italy, active Seattle, Washington state and Murano, Italy,  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC 

The museum describes the techniques as ‘incalmo’ in which glass bubbles are joined to create bands of colour.  When the glass cools, he cuts patterns into the glass.

 

 

 

 

 

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No darling, thank heavens I can’t remember a wife; and side view, 2006; packaging tape on Plexiglas with light box.   

Mark Khaisman, born 1958.  Delaware Art Musuem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baba Yaga’s Teapots for Brewing Light and Dark Spells, 2009. sterling silver and glass. 

Wendy Yothers, American born 1952 and George Kennard, American DOB not known. Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC from whose website these photos.

 

 

 

 

 

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Shadowfield/Colored Light, 2007, and detail; stainless steel and florescent plexiglass. 

Warren Seelig, American, Reading Public Museum, Reading, Pennsylvania 

 

 

 

 

 

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Spinning Wheel, 2007, glass, cocobolo, steel, brass and leather. 

Andy Paiko, American born 1977.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC.

 

 

 

 

Curtains and Balcony Bracelet, 33% glass-filled polyamide, 2008.

Joshua DeMonte, American born 1984.  The Smithsonian Renwick Museum, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

 

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Reclining Dress Impression with Drapery, 2009, glass.

Karen LaMonte, American born 1967.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington DC

 

 

 

 

Rückenfigur, 2009, neon and paint.

Glen Ligon, American  born 1960.  Whitney Museum of American Art, NY

 

 

 

Pix-Cell Deer #24, taxidermied deer with artificial crystal glass. 

Kohei Nawa, Japanese born 1975, based in Kyoto.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

 

 

 

Double America, 2012, neon and paint. 

Glen Ligon, American born 1960.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hahn/Cock, 2013, glass fiber re-inforced polyester resin fixed on stainless steel supporting structure. 

Katharina Fritsch, German born 1956.  Glenstone Museum, Potomac, MD on loan to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC in 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mining Industries:  Downtown Boston, 2015, glass and steel, 2015.

Norwood Viviano, American born 1972.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery. A sector of Boston cast in glass. 

The level below the top is a real map of the area executed in glass.

 

 

 

 

 

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 Force Field, and detail; 2016; glass, magnets and steel.

Megan Biddle, American, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  On view at the Arts Alliance, Philadelphia, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Reverse of one of the figures

Detail of the stand

Faith and Fate, 2016, glass smalti, tempered glass with paper underlay and handcrafted Milagros grouted to a two-sided metal base.  Barbara Bix, American born 1980. 

Artist loan to the 2018 Juried show at the Woodmere Museum, Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

Convergence, 2016, slumped glass

Megan Biddle, American, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  On view at the Arts Alliance, Philadelphia, 2016

 

 

 

 

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Folding the Chesapeake, 2015, marbles and adhesive. 

A reproduction by Maya Lin, American, born 1956, of the outline of the Chesapeake Bay for the re-installation of the Smithsonian Renwick Gallery in 2015

 

 

 

 

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 Untitled, Botanical and detail; 2015; doghair, carbon burn-out on glass in custom steel frame. 

Sharyn O’Mara, Tyler School of Art, Temple University.  Exhibited at the Arts Alliance, Philadelphia, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

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Grey, 2014, and detail:  flame-worked press glass, 2014.

Amber Cowan in the possession of the artist.  Exhibited at the Philadelphia Arts Alliance in 2015

 

 

 

 

 

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Devil’s Horns Crystal Brass Knuckles (Lefty), 2015, quartz crystal and sterling silver.

Debra Baxter, American born 1972.  Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC from whose website this photo

 

 

 

 

 

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 Smoky Gray Bowls, and detail, 2016; flameworked and hot sculpted American pressed glass.

 Amber Cowan, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  Shown at the Arts Alliance in 2016 in Philadelphia courtesy of Heller Gallery, NY

 

 

 

 

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dsc00041 Detail of a work of fused and sintered glass.

Sharyn O’Mara in 2016, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  Shown at the Arts Alliance, Philadelphia in 2016 

 

 

 

 

 

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 Rosette in Milk and Ivory, and detail; 2013; flame worked, pressed and sheet glass, mixed media.

Amber Cowan, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  Shown at the Arts Alliance in 2016 in Philadelphia courtesy of Heller Gallery, NY

 

 

 

 

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Lights above the main hallway of the Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC.  Code governs lighting sequences which are never exactly the same. 2015

Leo Villareal, American born 1967.

 

 

 

 

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Natural Lace, 2018, glass, copper leaf foil.

Tsukada Midori, Japanese born 1972. 

The artist trained as a metalworker.  She layered glass and applied copper leaf foil which fused in the kiln.

 

 

 

 

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KUU-62, sheet glass.

Ikuta Niyoko, born 1953.  Philadelphia Art Museum. 

Individual sheets of glass glued together with clear glue to refract light.

 

 

 

 

 

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Iteration and Symbiosis #1 and #2, oil on plexiglass and oil on black plexiglass, 2019. 

Chenlin Cai exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia in 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Plastic bottles, oil and pigment pen on canvas, 2020. 

Rebecca Giles, 2020 Bachelor of Arts at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “Glass and its imitators

  1. What an informative and delightful piece!!! Thank you for allowing this reader to wander through the stained glass like Alice in Wonderland! Covid-19 has impacted so much of our impromptu recreational lives, that for some people, like myself, we forget things that once made us happy. Of course we recall the bigger things like going to a play or to the movies, but small things like a walking tour wasn’t missed by me until today. And it happened in a way, that I hadn’t imagined. Because museums earn my spontaneous visits, based on a visiting exhibit or a curated artist. Only when I’m traveling do I plan to visit an art museum, and it’s based on that museum’s collection. But rarely do I plan a trip to my local museum, however today that will change.

    Today, your awesome photographs, accompanied by your descriptions have inspired this woman to book timed tickets to the local museum and to get an annual membership for her family.

    What an awesome post! Thank you 😊

    Stay safe🙏

    1. Such a generous-spirited response! Thank you.

      I have a long memory of the museums I have visited and the work of artists have helped me understand how many ways there are of being and acting in the world. And most of them, like you, working alone trying, trying and often succeeding.

      I am glad you will be walking into these magnificent collections now more often. I know you will enjoy! Sarah

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