The Meadow Garden at Mt. Cuba, Hockessin, Delaware

The Meadow Garden, Mt. Cuba, Hockessin, Delaware

To see a World in a Grain of Sand, And Heaven in a Wild Flower, Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand, And Eternity in an hour.

William Blake, 1757-1827, English, from Auguries of Innocence, published 1863

 

 

A  sloping meadow garden was planted by the proprietor of Mt. Cuba, Pamela Lammot du Pont Copeland (1906-2001, American) in Hockessin, Delaware

 

Pathways and waterways, Mt. Cuba, DE June 2015-16

 

in a rectangular field of about two acres, beginning in the late 1970s.

100,000 follicles of eight kinds of grass were sown; and 30 varieties of wildflowers. The grasses predominate.

 

 

 

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The dogwood in the garden meadow viewed from the shade of a sour gum (Nyssa sylvatica) tree in September 2018

 

 

 

 

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A path edges the meadow garden on three sides. The fourth side is guarded by a stand of witch’s brooms.

 

 

 

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The meadow beyond a witch’s broom in October 2016

 

 

The meadow garden is maintained as is any other garden.  It is weeded.  Invasives are removed.

You can walk through this meadow (you don’t, you wouldn’t) when you could not through an untended meadow for the massed thickets an untended meadow becomes.

Hawks wheel and float overhead looking for small mammals living in the meadow garden; of whom the vole is said to be the most heavily predated on the continent.

The changes of colour and appearance in the meadow garden and its immediate surroundings throughout the year are astounding. 

Starting with the unremarkable pale yellow cream of winter/spring stubble through the variegated greens of grass and leaf in summer and the colours of flowers, to the flux and haze of autumnal hues.

In autumn, many grasses stand taller than humans.

These photos were taken over five years, 2014-2019, between Mt. Cuba’s annual opening (to general public access) in April and closing in November.  They reflect seasonal changes whose beginning, end and duration vary from one year to the next.

The meadow garden horticulturalist, who was instrumental in establishing this meadow garden and in maintaining it until his retirement in 2017, has written a monograph about this venture.  This can be found on the website of Mt. Cuba (Mt. Cuba Center).

Mt. Cuba is a paradise of native plants (native to the Piedmont of the eastern US).

It has more than one heart. These are communities of plants:

bog and water-loving plants; trillium; mosses; a trial garden; witch’s brooms; the South Garden; and areas kept open where the Appalachian Piedmont is in full view.

Mt. Cuba’s Japanese primula form a heart of a particular kind because they are not native, are there because the founder loved them and because they connect Mt. Cuba to that prime heart place, the Quarry Garden at Winterthur, the last of Henry Francis du Pont’s (1880-1969, American) garden legacies.

These communities, of course, include the fauna they sustain.

 

 

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A view of the Piedmont in early November 2018 beyond an honour guard of Virginia sweetspire (Itea virginica)

 

 

 

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And in mid-November 2018

 

 

 

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November 2019:  autumn delayed.  Hair-awn muhly in pots on Mt. Cuba’s terrace

 

 

 

These hearts are connected by pathways, arteries and allées of uncounted numbers of native trees, bushes, flowering plants and grasses of many kinds. 

The meadow garden is one such heart:  dazzling and multifaceted like a jewel throwing off light in every season.

 

 

 

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The oak tree in the meadow garden seen across one of four bodies of water in Mt. Cuba on a day in June 2015

 

 

The greatest pleasure, for which I thank the staff of Mt. Cuba, a heart community also and of course.

By far and necessarily the first among equal hearts.  As it were.

There are only two trees in the meadow garden itself:  a white oak and a flowering dogwood.

 

 

 

April

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The dogwood (Cornus florida) in the meadow garden

 

 

 

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The oak tree in the meadow garden

 

 

 

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The meadow garden horticulturalists in April 2016 in the meadow garden

 

 

May

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The dogwood

 

 

 

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The oak tree

 

 

 

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Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in mid-June 2018

 

 

 

July

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The dogwood

 

 

 

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The oak tree

 

 

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Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa)

 

 

 

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Spike Gayfeather (Liatris spicata)

 

 

 

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Bee Balm (Monarda)

 

 

 

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A form of Monarda with a triple crown

 

 

 

August

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The dogwood in flower

 

 

 

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The oak tree

 

 

 

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Early goldenrod (Solidago juncea)

 

 

 

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Black-eyed susan (Rudbeckia fulgida) 

 

 

 

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Blue dogbane (Amsonia tabarnaemontana) setting off black-eyed susans

 

 

 

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Mohr’s Rosinweed  (Silphium mohrii) 

 

 

 

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Staff and volunteers there to weed the meadow garden

 

 

 

September

 

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The path at one side of the meadow garden with black-eyed susans 

 

 

 

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The dogwood tree with its feet in black-eyed susans among other plants

 

 

 

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The oak tree

 

 

 

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A variety of goldenrod

 

 

 

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Hyssop leaf thoroughwart (Eupatorium hyssopifolium)

 

 

 

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White false indigo  (Baptisia alba) 

 

 

 

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Showy goldenrod facing the dogwood tree

 

 

 

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Clustered mountain mint (Pycanthemum muticum)

 

 

 

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Obedient plant (Physostegia virginiana)

 

 

 

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A variety of aster 

 

 

 

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A monarch feeding on hollow-stem Joe Pyeweed (Eutrochium fistulosum)

 

 

 

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Hollow-stem Joe Pyeweed bowing to the grasses of the meadow garden

 

 

 

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The meadow garden glimpsed through a stand of witch’s brooms which guards the meadow along one edge

 

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Visitors filing along one side of the meadow garden

 

 

 

October

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The dogwood

 

 

 

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The oak tree

 

 

 

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White aster in the meadow

 

 

 

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Hyssop Leaf Thoroughwort (Eupatorium hyssopifolium) shot from above

 

 

 

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 Slender goldentop (Euthamia caroliniana)

 

 

 

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Swamp sunflower (Helianthus angustifolius)

 

 

 

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Hair-awn muhly (Muhlenbergia capillaris), one of the meadow garden grasses

 

 

 

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The fruit of the buttonbush shrub (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

 

 

 

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Mistflower (Conoclinium coelistinum)

 

 

 

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A variety of goldenrod facing the meadow garden

 

 

 

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November

 

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The meadow approached from the lake in early November, 2019

 

 

 

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The path along one side of the meadow garden

 

 

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The path after the first snow in mid-November

 

 

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The dogwood

 

 

 

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The oak tree

 

 

 

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The oak tree visible behind the dogwood in early November

 

 

 

DSC00145The oak tree and the dogwood on a mid-November day after the first snow

 

 

 

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The last hurrahs of the black-eyed susans

 

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One of the native goldenrods (?) in late November, 2019

 

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Yellow Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutrans), one of the meadow  garden grasses

 

 

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Broom sedge in late November 2019 

 

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Love grass (Eragrostis spectabilis), one of the meadow garden grasses

 

 

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Native milkweed which had still not released all its seeds in late November 2019 after an erratic Autumn

 

 

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Prarie dropseed (Sporobolis heterolepis),in mid November, 2018 after the first snow

 

 

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After the first snow

 

 

 

Autumn 2015-18

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