Small Talk at Sundown

 

 

DUO AS THE LIGHT IS GOING

 

W.S. Merwin, American born 1937.  From The Moon Before Morning, 2014

 

 

Those two go on with what they are saying at the ends of their long

 

 

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The Love Ballad of B. Charles/returning of the sender, 2017, oil on panel.  Graham Preston, American, unknown birthdate.  Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

 

lengthening shadows
while the sun sinks in silence

 

 

 

DSC01384Detail of The Love Ballad of B. Charles/returning of the sender, 2017, oil on panel.  Graham Preston, American, unknown birthdate.  Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

 

 

the one gesturing is Painted On

 

 

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Woman in Interior, 22-colour lithograph and seriograph with collage.  David Driskell, American born 1931.  Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

boasting even in silhouette

 

 

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Detail of Woman in Interior, 22-colour lithograph and seriograph with collage.  David Driskell, American born 1931.  Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia

 

 

to Burned In who in response

 

 

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Briarpatch Blues, woodcut printing plate, no date given.  Alison Saar, American born 1956.  Loaned to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2017 by Lafayette College, Pennsylvania

 

 

says not a thing.

 

 

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Detail of Briarpatch Blues, woodcut printing plate, no date given.  Alison Saar, American born 1956.  Loaned to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2017 by Lafayette College, Pennsylvania

 

 

Briarpatch Blues when the sun has risen

 

 

Briarpatch Blues, 2014, seriagraph, relief print with chine colle. Alison Saar, American born 1956.  Photo from the website of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia

The museum explains this as both a retelling of the story of the anxious wait by the great goddess Demeter for her daughter Persephone to return to the surface of the earth at the start of Spring; and the difficulty of raising Afro-American children; and the ‘ordinary’ grief of the empty-nest syndrome when children leave home to take up their adult lives.

 

2 thoughts on “Small Talk at Sundown

  1. I periodically go through a google search to update my C.V./ resume in order to catch anything I’ve missed and to make sure any links that I have listed are still working, any how, during my most recent search, I came across your blog. I want to thank you, so much, for including my work on your site. It truly means so much to know that it means something to you. I love the pairing of my painting along with the poetry and the other works you’ve photographed. You made me smile and made my heart swell. Keep up the good work! What a wonderful documentation of the things you’ve seen and want to share with the world!

    Sincerely,

    Graham Preston

    1. I appreciate most the comments of artists. I very much liked this painting. I am always so happy to see figurative and realistic work especially when it is suffused with intuitions and possibilities not obvious to the eyes of those of us who are not artists. I hope you continue your work. I’ll be looking out for it and will subscribe to your blog. Thank you very much. Sarah

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