Leaves of Glass

Leaves and so many flowers.  Also rivers, rivulets, icicles, force fields.   

Fans and feathers, medallions, ruffs and dog hair.

Eyes and necks and mouths.

Thick walls and thin; surfaces rippled, stippled and smooth; mottled, hairy, striated,  knobby, veined and curled. 

Intimations, not – thank goodness – of mortality, but of delicious liquids to drink in company and alone all year long.

Best of all, light through color and color magnified by light:  transparent, translucent and opaque: transmitting rainbows.

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Dip-molded, blown folded foot made in Iran during the 19th century.  Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Still Life with Oysters, a Silver Tazza and Glassware, 1635, oil on wood.  William Claesz Heda,  Dutch, 1594-1680.  Philadelphia Museum of Art

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Roemer; the map of the Rhine River from Mainz to Utrecht engraved by a diamond point engraver.  Dutch; early 17th century.  Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Vase of blown, acid-edged and gilded glass made between 1901 and 1915 by the Honesdale Decorating Company which operated in Honesdale, Pennsylvania between 1901 and 1932.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

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Cream pitcher of press glass made between 1883/84 – 1991 by Challinor Taylor and Company, 1886-1900; Tarentum, Pennsylvania.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

 

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Punch bowl, free blown lead glass, etched with a ‘Kalana Lily’ pattern; made by C. Dorflinger and Sons, who operated in White Mills, Pennsylvania from 1865-1921. Philadelphia Museum of Art

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Cameo vase, 1886-’87.  Free-blown glass in which blue glass was overlaid with white glass.  Made in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by Gillinder & Sons, 1871-1930 

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Vase made in Brooklyn, NY between 1901 and 1920 of blown glass by the Quezal Art Glass and Decorating Company, 1901-1924.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

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Blown and cut glass made in New York state between 1885 and 1900.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

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Blown, cut and engraved glass made between 1915 and 1925 by Steuben Glassworks (1903-Present) in Corning, NY.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

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Vase of free-blown glass, 1905;  made by  Honesdale Decorating Company, 1901-1932; Honesdale, Pennsylvania in 1905.  Philadelphia Museum of Art

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Iridescent Handkerchief Glass; straw, opal soda-lime glass made by the Whitefriars Glassworks, England which operated between 1836 and 1980.  Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington

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Pitcher made between 1886 and 1890 by Hobbs, Brockunier and Company in Wheeling, West Virginia, 1863-1891.  Blown-molded, non-lead glass decorated with pointed hobnail pattern

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 The Viking Ship, 1883-’84, stained glass; Edward Burne-Jones, 1833-1894, British with Morris and Company (1875-1940).  Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington

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Blown, acid-etched and gilded glass made by the Honesdale Decorating Company in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, 1901-1932.  Metropolitan Museum of New York

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Vase with acid-etched decoration made as sculpture in 1923 by Maurice Marinot, 1882-195o, French.  On display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2015 and 2016

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Thick-walled glassware made as sculpture in 1923 by Maurice Marinot, 1882-195o, French.  On display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2015 and 2016

Thick-walled glassware made as sculpture by Maurice Marinot, 1882-195o, French.  On display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2015 and 2016

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The Written Object (the bottle of milk), 1967; photographic canvas with four painted milk bottles on a painted wooden shelf.  Marcel Broodthaers, 1924-1976, Belgian.  On exhibition at MOMA, New York, 2015 and 2016 

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Untitled (Night Train), 1989, glass, silicone, glass and coal; David Hammons, born 1943, American.  Museum of Modern Art, NY 

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Persian Windows; blown glass, 1999 and 2000 and 2005; Dale Chihuly, born 1941, American.  Delaware Art Museum

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Folding the Chesapeake, 2015, marbles and adhesive. A reproduction by Maya Lin, American, born 1956, of the outline of the Chesapeake Bay for the re-installation of The Renwick Museum, the Museum of American Art of the Smithsonian, Washington, DC in 2015

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 Untitled, Botanical and detail; 2015; doghair, carbon burn-out on glass in custom steel frame.  Sharyn O’Mara, Tyler School of Art, Temple University.  Exhibited at the Arts Alliance, Philadelphia, 2016

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Grey, 2014, and detail:  flame-worked press glass made in 2014 by Amber Cowan in the possession of the artist.  Exhibited at the Philadelphia Arts Alliance in 2015

 

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 Smoky Gray Bowls, and detail, 2016; flameworked and hot sculpted American pressed glass.  Amber Cowan, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  Shown at the Arts Alliance in 2016 in Philadelphia courtesy of Heller Gallery, NY

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 Detail of a work of fused and sintered glass made by Sharyn O’Mara in 2016, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  Shown at the Arts Alliance, Philadelphia in 2016 

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 Rosette in Milk and Ivory, and detail; 2013; flame worked, pressed and sheet glass, mixed media. Amber Cowan, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  Shown at the Arts Alliance in 2016 in Philadelphia courtesy of Heller Gallery, NY

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Shadowfield/Colored Light, 2007, and detail; stainless steel and florescent plexiglass.  Warren Seelig, American, Reading Public Museum, Reading, Pennsylvania 

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 Force Field, and detail; 2016; glass, magnets and steel; Megan Biddle, American, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia.  On view at the Arts Alliance, Philadelphia, 2016

 

3 thoughts on “Leaves of Glass

  1. Just so interesting the work of artists/artisans today making their way in an artisanal tradition of such sophistication. They do not have the ‘out’ of the Conceptual painters and the Scribble-rubbish painters where anything goes on a canvas. So encouraging!

    Like

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